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PostPosted: 29 Jul 2017 11:46 
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Joined: 21 Jul 2013 13:13
Posts: 170
I reproduce a story by one Laura .

Please read this and the following article on this topic. You should keep in mind about this strange bedfellows, namely tooth decay and prostate problems.
My brother died at age 59 from prostate cancer. He may have kept info from us about how long back he has the issues with his prostate. He had a 1970’s mindset about caner which might have killed him. He put off getting the tests and the treatment. My bro was one of the strongest people I know physically. At the end as the cancer spread to his eye and face and wasted him away-he still built shelves and did yard work. In fact he somehow raked the backyard of leaves the day before going into the final stages toward death. A week earlier he installed a bathroom shelf with my help.
Please, death from this is usually preventable-get the tests, get the treatment. My bro died in 2013 but may have symptoms as early as 1999.
One more thing. My bro had terrible dental pain for several years before his diagnosis of prostate cancer/ After reading this article I wonder if it may have been related.

Prostate Health May Be Linked to Periodontal Health
02/04/2014 Written by Tiffany DiGiacinto

Researchers continue to uncover evidence linking oral health and overall health and the latest example examines the possible relationship between periodontitis and prostatitis.
What is periodontitis?
Periodontitis is a common but serious gum infection that destroys the soft tissue and bone that support your teeth and is often the result of poor oral hygiene. Symptoms include swollen and sensitive gums, loosening of teeth and bad breath. Periodontitis can cause tooth loss and has been linked to an increased risk of heart attack or stroke and other serious health problems.
What is prostatitis?
Prostatitis is swelling and inflammation of the prostate gland, a walnut-size gland associated with the male reproductive system. Symptoms include pain or burning when urinating, difficulty urinating, frequent urination and pain in the abdomen, groin or lower back. In many cases of prostatitis, the cause is not identified. When a cause is identified, a bacterial infection is often the culprit. Immune system disorders, nervous system disorders or injury to the prostate area can also cause prostatitis.
What is the relation between periodontitis and prostate health?
Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is an enzyme created in the prostate that is normally secreted in very small amounts. When the prostate becomes inflamed, infected or affected by cancer, PSA levels rise. Research has shown that men with indicators of periodontal disease and prostatitis have higher levels of PSA than men with only one of these conditions.
In one such study by Case Western Reserve University School of Dental Medicine and University Hospitals Case Medical Center, researchers selected 35 men, most of them patients who had mild to severe periodontitis and in some cases, also suffered from prostate cancer. All had not had dental work done for at least three months and were given an exam to measure their gum health. The results found that those patients with the most severe form of prostatitis also showed signs of periodontitis.
What can we do to decrease our risk?
Risk factors for prostatitis include:
• Being a young or middle-ages man
• Having a bladder or urethra infection
• Not drinking enough fluids
• Having unprotected sex
• Using an urinary catheter
http://deltadentalazblog.com/prostate-h ... al-health/

UA Mohammed


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PostPosted: 02 Aug 2017 10:52 
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Mohammed, A very interesting article. The mention of prostate pathology linked to oral health reminds me of a patient I was treating several years ago.

He was a 60+ patient who needed his hip replaced. I did a total joint replacement. It was a routine procedure. Our department routine was to give 3 doses of antibiotics for all joint replacements (one dose with premed and two further doses postoperatively. His postoperative period was uneventful and he went home walking a week later.

When I reviewed him at 6 weeks there was slight inflammation at the lower end of the wound. Thinking that it could be a superficial infection and not wanting to take a chance, I put him on a 10 day course of antibiotics. Inflammation appeared to settle and I thought that was the end of it. About 3 weeks later he came back with a slight discharge from the lower end of the wound. When I investigated the problem, to my horror it suggested a discharging sinus with the sinugram showing its extention to the hip joint. We started a 6 week course of antibiotic which seemed to stop the discharge. However 2 weeks after stopping the antibiotic it started discharging again.

This time a thorough examination suggested nothing more than a caries molar tooth. I sent him to the dentist for treatment. No sooner was the tooth extracted the discharge from the hip stopped and the sinus dried up for good. Luckily there was no permanent damage to the joint. From that day on, I started checking the oral hygiene of every patient who was listed for joint replacement!


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PostPosted: 04 Aug 2017 13:39 
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Joined: 21 Jul 2013 13:13
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Hi Badri

Thank you for your reply with an interesting case which lays emphasis on importance of ruling out focal sepsis in a general examination of any patient. I remember our dermatology professor Dr Thambiah very often referring his chronic dermatological cases to general OP to rule out focal sepsis. His main emphasis was on ENT and dental examination. Even in myocardial infarctions focal sepsis is incriminated. I have seen many times, in our anxiety not to waste time as each hour wasted in the case of an acute coronary syndrome so much myocardium is lost, regular routine check-ups are missed. Though when we deal with septic conditions we do look into cardiovascular complications, we seldom give attention to the hidden septic state in a cardiovascular setting. Nowadays, it is organ specific management that is what is happening most of the time. In stead a senior level general physician should be involved in all cases so that more comprehensive treatment can be given to the patient. Of course apart from anaesthetic opinion in some centres general physician is called to give medical fitness certificate before any intervention. What he usually does is just goes through the investigation report and puts his seal of approval for the procedure. That is not enough. He should be involved from the beginning till the patient becomes stable.
UA Mohammed


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