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 Post subject: Winging of Scapula
PostPosted: 15 Dec 2016 20:54 
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Joined: 26 Feb 2013 10:59
Posts: 650
This topic was posted by Dr Sridhar of IMA CGP WhatsApp journal

Winging of scapula (rt side).

Causes: Most commonly due to injury to Long Thoracic nerve leading to Serratus Anterior Palsy.
Other possibility is due to paralysis of Trapezius or Rhomboid muscles which is rare.
such condition can occur due to Trauma like Sports injury, Iatrogenic due to Mastectomy with axillary Lymphnode dissection, management of pneumothorax , Electric shock etc.

Very rarely Genetic disorder like Facioscapulohumeral dystrophy can lead to this.
Mainly Flexion n Abduction of shoulder is affected, Making Activities like Combing hair, wearing clothes, Lift, Push or Pull weighty objects difficult.

Treatment: is Mainly Physiotherapy. Rarely in prolonged palsies Surgery is indicated.


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 Post subject: Re: Winging of Scapula
PostPosted: 15 Dec 2016 23:30 
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A winged scapula can follow an injury during sport or trauma to the neck - the scapula sticks out in the back. This can be uncomfortable and may be disabling as shoulder elevation is limited.

Causes for Winging of Scapula
1. Compression of the long thoracic nerve at the level of the brachial plexus (up high in the neck) or
2. a complete injury to the nerve.

Compression of the nerve can be treated by physical therapy. When therapy is ineffective, decompression of the nerve by dividing the soft tissues causing the compression is undertaken.

When the nerve is completely damaged, surgeons can perform a nerve transfer procedure. Usually branches of the nerve innervating the latissimus dorsi muscle are transferred to the long thoracic nerve.

After surgery, patients can still use their latissimus dorsi muscle. However, after the nerve transfer procedure some retraining of the muscle function will be necessary to get the serratus anterior to function effectively.

Recovery of function: Recovery after nerve transfer can be prolonged. Patients usually see some signs of recovery in three to six months after the operation, but in most cases, it will take six to 12 months for full recovery.

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 Post subject: Re: Winging of Scapula
PostPosted: 20 Dec 2016 14:03 
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Joined: 21 Jul 2013 13:13
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Hi Badri
A very nice and rare topic with beautifully illustrations deserves good appreciation. Please convey our members' wishes to Dr Sridhar and why don't you ask him to become a regular member of our club and contribute articles which I think would be of immense value.

UA Mohammed


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